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Variables affecting factors associated with primary headache

Athanasia Alexoudi, Konstadinos Politis, Anthi Moukidou, Rebekka Tsatovidou, Sarantoula Ververaki, Antonios Tavernarakis, Anna Siatouni, Anastasia Verentzioti, Dimos Mitsikostas, Stylianos Gatzonis
  • Athanasia Alexoudi
    Department of Neurosurgery, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece | alexoudath@yahoo.gr
  • Konstadinos Politis
    Department of Statistics and Insurance Science, University of Piraeus, Greece
  • Anthi Moukidou
    Department of Statistics and Insurance Science, University of Piraeus, Greece
  • Rebekka Tsatovidou
    Department of Neurology, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Sarantoula Ververaki
    Department of Neurology, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Antonios Tavernarakis
    Department of Neurology, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Anna Siatouni
    Department of Neurosurgery, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Anastasia Verentzioti
    Department of Neurosurgery, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Dimos Mitsikostas
    Department of Neurology, Aeginition Hospital, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
  • Stylianos Gatzonis
    Department of Neurosurgery, National & Kapodistrian University of Athens, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens, Greece

Abstract

Primary headache syndromes’ development is associated with biological, psychological and social parameters. Factors such as daily habits, behavioral characteristics and sleep disorders also play an important role. We aim to identify the variables which affect the above factors. The study included 111 patients affected by primary headache. The patients were stratified into subgroups according to gender, age, occupation and headache type. Women attained higher scores than men in three of the evaluation rating scales and lower scores in the severity of dependence scale. Occupation was associated with SF36 and Hamilton anxiety scale. Unemployed had higher scores in Hamilton anxiety. Migraineurs and occupied individuals have lower SF36 scores. Women are associated with depression, anxiety and higher disability derived from headache. Men are more prone to dependence on opioids. Unemployment was linked with anxiety and well-being. The migraneurs presented a decreased level of quality of life.

Keywords

Primary headache; anxiety; depression; sleep; quality of life.

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Submitted: 2017-10-15 11:45:25
Published: 2018-01-08 09:26:51
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Copyright (c) 2018 Athanasia Alexoudi, Konstadinos Politis, Anthi Moukidou, Rebekka Tsatovidou, Sarantoula Ververaki, Antonios Tavernarakis, Anna Siatouni, Anastasia Verentzioti, Dimos Mitsikostas, Stylianos Gatzonis

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