Till surgery do us part: unexpected bilateral kissing molars

  • Narayanankutty Anish Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
  • Velayudhannair Vivek | vivekv@rediffmail.com Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
  • Sunila Thomas Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
  • Vineet Alex Daniel Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
  • Jincy Thomas Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
  • Prasanna Ranimol Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.

Abstract

The occurrence impacted teeth, single or multiple is very common. But, phenomenon of kissing molars is an extremely rare phenomenon. Mandibular third molars are the most common impacted teeth. Mandibular first or second molars does not share the same frequency of occurrence. But, there are rare cases in which the occlusal surfaces of impacted molars are united by the same follicular space and the roots point in the opposite direction, and are termed as kissing molars. Sometimes, these teeth will be associated with pathologies. This article reports a rare case of mandibular bilateral kissing molars.

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Author Biographies

Narayanankutty Anish, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala
Oral Medicine and Radiology, Post Graduate Student
Velayudhannair Vivek, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala

Professor & Head of Department

Oral Medicine & Radiology

Sunila Thomas, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala

Professor

Oral Medicine & Radiology

Vineet Alex Daniel, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala
Reader
Oral Medicine & Radiology
Jincy Thomas, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala

Senior Lecturer

Oral Medicine & Radiology

Prasanna Ranimol, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, PMS College of Dental Science & Research, Trivandrum, Kerala

Senior Lecturer 

Oral Medicine & Radiology
Published
2015-02-02
Section
Case Reports
Keywords:
kissing molars, impaction, rosette formation, mandibular.
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How to Cite
Anish, N., Vivek, V., Thomas, S., Daniel, V., Thomas, J., & Ranimol, P. (2015). Till surgery do us part: unexpected bilateral kissing molars. Clinics and Practice, 5(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/cp.2015.688