Triorchidism: presenting as undescended testis in a case of indirect inguinal hernia

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Ajay H. Bhandarwar *
Saurabh S. Gandhi
Chintan B. Patel
Amol N. Wagh
Virendra Gawli
Nimesh A. Jain
(*) Corresponding Author:
Ajay H. Bhandarwar | abhandarwar@gmail.com

Abstract

Triorchidism is the commonest variety of polyorchidism, an entity with more than two testis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly of the testis. Although excision of the abnormal testis is a safer alternative proposed, recent literature suggests more conservative approach in normal testes with watchful regular follow up to screen for malignancy. This case presented as a left inguinal swelling diagnosed as indirect left inguinal hernia. The left side testis was of smaller size (about half) with normal sperm count, morphology and motility. Intraoperatively indirect inguinal hernia was noted with supernumerary testis at deep ring in addition to normal left testis in left scrotal sac. The ectopic testis were small (2.5×2.5×1 cm) lacking epididymis and with short vas deferens. An evident normal semen analysis and varied anatomy, the decision for orchidectomy of ectopic testis was taken. The histopathological finding was consistent with arrest in germ cell development.

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Author Biographies

Ajay H. Bhandarwar, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

PROFESSOR & UNIT CHIEF,

DIVISION OF GI, HPB & MINIMAL ACCESS SURGERY, DEPTARTMENT OF SURGERY, GRANT MEDICAL COLLEGE & SIR JJ GROUP OF HOSPITALS, MUMBAI, INDIA

Saurabh S. Gandhi, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

Assistant Professor,
Department of Surgery,
Division of GI,HPB, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery,
Grant Government Medical College &
Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals,
Byculla, Mumbai - 400008,
Maharashtra, India.

Chintan B. Patel, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

Assistant Professor,
Department of Surgery,
Division of GI,HPB, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery,
Grant Government Medical College &
Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals,
Byculla, Mumbai - 400008,
Maharashtra, India.

Amol N. Wagh, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

Assistant Professor,
Department of Surgery,
Division of GI,HPB, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery,
Grant Government Medical College &
Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals,
Byculla, Mumbai - 400008,
Maharashtra, India.

Virendra Gawli, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

Chief Resident,
Department of Surgery, 
Division of GI,HPB, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery,
Grant Government Medical College &
Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals,
Byculla, Mumbai - 400008,
Maharashtra, India.

Nimesh A. Jain, Division of Gastrointestinal, Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Grant Government Medical College & Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals, Byculla, Mumbai, Maharashtra

Chief Resident,
Department of Surgery, 
Division of GI,HPB, Minimal Access, Bariatric & Metabolic Surgery,
Grant Government Medical College &
Sir J.J. Group of Hospitals,
Byculla, Mumbai - 400008,
Maharashtra, India.