Clinics and Practice https://clinicsandpractice.org/index.php/cp <p><strong>Clinics and Practice</strong> [ISSN 2039-7283] is a peer-reviewed, Open Access, online-only journal that publishes <em>clinical reports,</em> <em>brief reports</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>case reports</em>&nbsp;in all areas of clinical medicine. Our journal would welcome any interesting description of patients, procedures and treatment in any condition or disease that can contribute to develop scientifically rigorous and clinically meaningful practice methods. <br><strong>Clinics and Practice</strong> aims at creating an innovative, rapid and collaborative background intended to help healthcare professionals finding the latest advances to answer the most pressing questions coming from the medicine/patients relationship.</p> en-US <p><strong>PAGEPress</strong> has chosen to apply the&nbsp;<a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial 4.0 International License</strong></a>&nbsp;(CC BY-NC 4.0) to all manuscripts to be published.<br><br> An Open Access Publication is one that meets the following two conditions:</p> <ol> <li class="show">the author(s) and copyright holder(s) grant(s) to all users a free, irrevocable, worldwide, perpetual right of access to, and a license to copy, use, distribute, transmit and display the work publicly and to make and distribute derivative works, in any digital medium for any responsible purpose, subject to proper attribution of authorship, as well as the right to make small numbers of printed copies for their personal use.</li> <li class="show">a complete version of the work and all supplemental materials, including a copy of the permission as stated above, in a suitable standard electronic format is deposited immediately upon initial publication in at least one online repository that is supported by an academic institution, scholarly society, government agency, or other well-established organization that seeks to enable open access, unrestricted distribution, interoperability, and long-term archiving.</li> </ol> <p>Authors who publish with this journal agree to the following terms:</p> <ol> <li class="show">Authors retain copyright and grant the journal right of first publication with the work simultaneously licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License that allows others to share the work with an acknowledgement of the work's authorship and initial publication in this journal.</li> <li class="show">Authors are able to enter into separate, additional contractual arrangements for the non-exclusive distribution of the journal's published version of the work (e.g., post it to an institutional repository or publish it in a book), with an acknowledgement of its initial publication in this journal.</li> <li class="show">Authors are permitted and encouraged to post their work online (e.g., in institutional repositories or on their website) prior to and during the submission process, as it can lead to productive exchanges, as well as earlier and greater citation of published work.</li> </ol> paola.granata@pagepress.org (Paola Granata) tiziano.taccini@pagepress.org (Tiziano Taccini) Tue, 19 May 2020 13:12:47 +0000 OJS 3.1.2.4 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 COVID-19: hemoglobin, iron, and hypoxia beyond inflammation. A narrative review https://clinicsandpractice.org/index.php/cp/article/view/1271 <p>Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has been regarded as an infective-inflammatory disease, which affects mainly lungs. More recently, a multi-organ involvement has been highlighted, with different pathways of injury. A hemoglobinopathy, hypoxia and cell iron overload might have a possible additional role. Scientific literature has pointed out two potential pathophysiological mechanisms: i) severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV- 2) interaction with hemoglobin molecule, through CD147, CD26 and other receptors located on erythrocyte and/or blood cell precursors; ii) hepcidin-mimetic action of a viral spike protein, inducing ferroportin blockage. In this translational medicine-based narrative review, the following pathologic metabolic pathways, deriving from hemoglobin denaturation and iron metabolism dysregulation, are highlighted: i) decrease of functioning hemoglobin quote; ii) iron overload in cell/tissue (hyperferritinemia); iii) release of free toxic circulating heme; iv) hypoxemia and systemic hypoxia; v) reduction of nitric oxide; vi) coagulation activation; vii) ferroptosis with oxidative stress and lipoperoxidation; viii) mitochondrial degeneration and apoptosis. A few clinical syndromes may follow, such as pulmonary edema based on arterial vasoconstriction and altered alveolo-capillary barrier, sideroblastic-like anemia, endotheliitis, vasospastic acrosyndrome, and arterio- venous thromboembolism. We speculated that in COVID-19, beyond the classical pulmonary immune-inflammation view, the occurrence of an oxygen-deprived blood disease, with iron metabolism dysregulation, should be taken in consideration. A more comprehensive diagnostic/therapeutic approach to COVID-19 is proposed, including potential adjuvant interventions aimed at improving hemoglobin dysfunction, iron over-deposit and generalized hypoxic state.</p> Attilio Cavezzi, Emidio Troiani, Salvatore Corrao Copyright (c) 2020 the Author(s) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://clinicsandpractice.org/index.php/cp/article/view/1271 Thu, 28 May 2020 09:02:35 +0000 Keratinocyte dissociation (desmolysis/acantholysis) in ameloblastoma https://clinicsandpractice.org/index.php/cp/article/view/1255 <p>Ameloblastoma is the only odontogenic tumor that displays diversified histomorphological features with subtypes like follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular cell, clear cell, desmoplastic etc. In this paper we presented an extremely unusual presentation of ameloblastoma, which is characterized by desmolysis or acantholysis of stellate reticulum-like cells caused due to keratinocyte dissociation. A 35-year-old male patient presented with a painless hard 3cm x 3cm swelling in the mandibular right posterior region since 4-5 months. Radiographic examination reveled a multi-locular radiolucent lesion in the body of mandible with resorption of the roots. Histopathological examination revealed ameloblastic follicles with central cells showing keratinocyte dissociation leading to desmolysis/acantholysis. Desmolytic cells were seen as an isolated entity in the follicular space with round to polygonal shaped morphology. Future retrospective studies on archival samples of ameloblastoma are recommended to relook into identification of such rare phenomenon. This will help in better understanding of the incidence rate and biological behavior of this rare variant of ameloblastoma.</p> Sachin C. Sarode, Gargi S. Sarode, Praveen Birur, Yaser A. Alhazmi, Shankargouda Patil Copyright (c) 2020 the Author(s) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 https://clinicsandpractice.org/index.php/cp/article/view/1255 Tue, 19 May 2020 13:08:50 +0000